Coco Tops the Box Office Again

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Coco movie monday

Thanksgiving is long gone. But at the movies, we’re still dealing with leftovers.

With Hollywood pivoting toward awards season, no major movies were released wide this week, leaving the box-office field in the domain of long-in-the-tooth holdovers. Indeed, the top five was a complete clone of last week’s.

Coco topped the weekend’s box-office tourney, collecting $26.1 million and bringing its total North American tally to $108.7 million. Add another $171 million from overseas, and Coco is giving Disney and Pixar something to sing about.

In second, Justice League gathered another $16.6 million to its marbled halls—perhaps not quite enough to buy Wonder Woman an invisible jet, but certainly enough to keep the Batmobile in unleaded for a while. Justice League’s total domestic tally now stands at a batarang under $200 million—$197.3 million, to be precise—and it’s now 10th among the year’s highest-grossing movies.

Wonder spent a second straight week at No. 3, banking a reasonably wonder-ful $12.5 million. It beat out Thor: Ragnarok ($9.7 million), which naturally settled for Thorth—er, fourth. Daddy’s Home 2 closed out the top five with $7.5 million.

The entertainment industry is always interested in how much money a movie makes at the box office, of course. But we’re also starting to see some awards hopefuls land in a few theaters here and there, prepping for their Oscar runs. Two Oscarbait flicks, Lady Bird and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, finished in a dead head for seventh place, both earning about $4.5 million. (Early estimates have Lady Bird with an ever-so-slight lead.)

The Disaster Artist opened in just 19 theaters, but still finished in the top 12 with $1.2 million. That’s a sky-high $64,254-per-theater average, in case you’re curious. (For the sake of comparison, Coco’s per-theater average was $6,550, about a tenth of The Disaster Artist.) But even that per-theater average looked pretty soggy compared to that of The Shape of Water. Sure, this merman-woman love story finished 19th with a mere $166,800—but it opened in just two theaters. Two! Do the math, and each one of those theaters banked $83,400.

Wonder Wheel, Woody Allen’s newest flick, finished 20th,  just behind The Shape of Water, with $140,555 in five theaters.

Who wrote this?

Paul Asay has been writing for Plugged In since 2007 and loves superheroes and finding God in unexpected places. In addition, Paul has also written several books, with his newest—Burning Bush 2.0—recently published by Abingdon Press. When Paul’s not reviewing movies, he hikes with his wife, Wendy, runs marathons with his grown kids, Colin and Emily, and beats back unruly houseplants. Follow him on Twitter @AsayPaul.

Have something to say? Leave a comment.

charitysplace 4 days ago
"This movie is bad news for Christians and for anyone who values the teachings of the apostles and Christ. You don't need to see it to figure that one out."

Why?

Why would a little pagan movie threaten my relationship with Jesus?

I saw Pocahontas a hundred times as a child. It has pagan themes galore, and failed to make a nit's bit of difference in my belief system. I doubt "Coco" will change my mind as an adult. If anything, it may enlighten me on how people of that belief system think and some of their core beliefs, which is valuable knowledge. 

It seems like this film is an excellent opportunity to talk to older kids about diverse belief systems and how each culture has their own mythology about life after death; how every civilization has believed in an afterlife, and that points toward the TRUE life after death, which is found in Christ.

Most things are opportunities to speak the truth, which you cannot do if you avoid them. ;)
bobed 4 days ago
You have a very different viewpoint than me. You don't think there is any danger in opening your mind to pagan customs and beliefs. I think the exact opposite. I'm sorry your parents were not discerning enough to keep you away from Pocahontas as a kid, but that doesn't mean I am going to let my own children fall victim to the same spiritual crime. 

Your thinking is very dangerously teetering on the edge of the idea that "well, ALL religions lead to the truth!" This is blatantly, flagrantly untrue. Jesus Christ is the way, the truth and the life. Not Buddha. Not Krishna. Not Allah. Not any folk religion or custom. Christ is the ONLY way to be saved, the only way to enter a perfect afterlife. Full stop. It is also my personal belief, based on Biblical evidence, that no "truth" can be found in other religions. 

If it is your wish to study other religions - which, I admit, can be useful if you intend to minister to those people - it is a much better idea to simply Google it and read an impassive Wikipedia article or something of the like. Coco is not a Wikipedia article, nor is it impassive. Coco is emotional, funny, and heartwarming, and it presents the Mexican religion in an emotional, funny, and heartwarming way. That will do nothing for your faith, and may in fact weaken it. At the very best, a born-again Christian with solid faith should feel very, very uncomfortable while watching a movie like Coco, which distorts, twists, and flat-out lies about the ultimate truth we can find in Christ and heaven, and presents these distortions and lies in a cute, funny, heartwarming and kid-friendly package. I know I feel uncomfortable thinking about it. That is no valid way to study a religion. That's a way to weaken your heart and your faith without even knowing it has been done. 

John 14:6 - Jesus said to him, "I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." 

1 Corinthians 8:5-6 - "For although there may be so-called gods in heaven or on earth—as indeed there are many “gods” and many “lords”— yet for us there is one God, the Father, from whom are all things and for whom we exist, and one Lord, Jesus Christ, through whom are all things and through whom we exist." 

Galatians 1:6-10 - "But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach to you a gospel contrary to the one we preached to you, let him be accursed. As we have said before, so now I say again: If anyone is preaching to you a gospel contrary to the one you received, let him be accursed. For am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God? Or am I trying to please man? If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ."

Deuteronomy 13:6-10 - “If your brother, the son of your mother, or your son or your daughter or the wife you embrace or your friend who is as your own soul entices you secretly, saying, ‘Let us go and serve other gods,’ which neither you nor your fathers have known, some of the gods of the peoples who are around you, whether near you or far off from you, from the one end of the earth to the other, you shall not yield to him or listen to him, nor shall your eye pity him, nor shall you spare him, nor shall you conceal him. But you shall kill him. Your hand shall be first against him to put him to death, and afterward the hand of all the people. You shall stone him to death with stones, because he sought to draw you away from the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery."

2 Thessalonians 2:9-12 - "The coming of the lawless one is by the activity of Satan with all power and false signs and wonders, and with all wicked deception for those who are perishing, because they refused to love the truth and so be saved. Therefore God sends them a strong delusion, so that they may believe what is false, in order that all may be condemned who did not believe the truth but had pleasure in unrighteousness."

Julienne Dy 4 days ago
I don't quite agree with everything that you've said, but you provide some good insight.
1. Every kid is different, and unfortunately, not every kid is going to process through this movie the same way, so I feel that it's important for parents to know and understand their kids before they take them to see this movie.
Take me and Disney princesses for example.  I look at a Disney princess, and I'm drawn by their kindness, courage, optimism, and selflessness (except for Ariel, honestly, her only redeeming quality is her curiosity, which isn't really all that redeeming).  Other girls may look at a Disney princess and get body issues.
2.  I think you have the right idea about teaching older children how to process through the media that they consume.  It will help them better understand why people believe what they do and maybe that understanding will help them to better own their faith.
3.  I'm not sure I want to see Coco.  On one hand, it's a movie centered around a pagan belief system.  On the other hand, I've also seen The Book of Life which had a similar premise, and pagan belief system aside, it did tell a very nice story, and based on what my sister had told me, Coco may be the same way.  On the other other hand, it's about Dia de los Muertos.  I know Mexicans love the holiday, but the idea of interacting with the ghosts of your dead ancestors creeps me out a bit, so I'm personally not a fan.  On the other other other hand, I'm a huge mythology buff.  I used to read a lot of books on mythology back when I was in high school.  On the other times four hand, I really, REALLY want to see that Frozen Christmas special that comes before the movie.  On the other times five hand, by the time I'll have time to see it, theaters won't be playing that special with the movie anymore!  >:-(  That gives us six hands for people keeping score.
Anonymous 5 days ago
Posted by First Comment Guy

I saw Justice League again this past weekend; I still feel like it's a good movie. It's Rotten Tomato score should be somewhere between 65-75% instead of 41%, imo.

A lot of people have a lot to complain about the movie, and while I think their complaints are valid, I'm surprised that no one else is having my biggest complaint.

Here it is:
"Why didn't Danny Elfman use the theme song from Justice League: The Animated Series?! That would've been GOLD! He brought back the theme songs from Tim Burton's Batman and Richard Donner's Superman, so how come he didn't do the same with JL:TAS? Come on..."

Okay, there it is.
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Anonymous 5 days ago
Posted by First Comment Guy

Thanks! I had been looking for that song!
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Evan Weisensel 5 days ago
Been waiting to do this one fore a while now, here goes! :D

Well Bobed and his pal InkFeather, they like to watch the films.

By chance they came upon the blogger's game and gosh they paid the price!

Pay the price....

And now they're fighting for their lives in a comment section fraught with dread!

And if they proceed but don't succeed...

Well....

The Moderators will take their heads!

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Evan Weisensel 5 days ago
It was a parody of the opening theme to Cuphead. (Go check it out, great game with wonderful hand drawn art...) :)
Inkfeather1 . 5 days ago
I think I will check it out. Just finished watching The Witcher 3 and have been looking for a new let's play to get into. Cuphead seems interesting :)
bobed 7 days ago
People seem to love paganism. I wonder if a Pixar made movie about the Nativity would do so well. The world is turning it's face away from Christ.
Anonymous 6 days ago
Part of the problem is that many Christian movies don't hold a candle to movies like Coco in terms of quality. It would be possible to do a great, tearjerking, high-quality movie about the Nativity—focus on Mary and Joseph as young parents in over their heads but willing to let God use them, which would humanize the entire story—but every Nativity movie I've seen is less about telling a good story and more about presenting a Sunday school lesson. 

Contrast that with The Prince of Egypt, which is unequivocally about Moses and makes it clear that God is behind the burning bush and the plagues, and is regarded as an animated classic. It's a good story well-told, and it trusts its characters to deliver its messages. It was the first movie that really brought the Exodus story to life for me, and I know I'm not the only one. It's possible to tell a Bible story in a way that non-Christians will watch, but to do that, filmmakers need to tell a story instead of preaching a sermon. 
bobed 6 days ago
Oh, yes, that old chestnut. I get that Christian movies on the whole aren't as good, but that is really, really not the point I'm trying to make here.

One of the biggest movies of the year is a movie that explicitly teaches pagan, counterfeit spirituality AND is specifically directed to young children in their most formative years. That's a huge cultural problem. HUGE. Coco is far more spiritually dangerous than a few bad Christian movies that barely manage to gross $5 million.
Anonymous 6 days ago
You're also comparing apples to oranges. You can't compare a film that is drop-dead gorgeous, beautifully written, meticulously researched, well-acted, and lovingly made to a bevy of workmanlike, poorly acted Christian films with ham-handed dialogue and say it's the worldview that's winning, because there is a mountain of other factors. Audiences who might not agree with Coco's worldview went to see it, because it's a stunning film that tells a good story. Audiences who might not agree with, say, The Star's worldview avoid it because it's neither well-made on a technical level nor able to tell the Nativity story in a way that engages non-Christian viewers. If Christian filmmakers made better films, I think audiences would be more willing to see them. People want to see good movies, and if Christian filmmakers want to compete with movies like Coco, they need to up their game. 
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Inkfeather1 . 6 days ago
Let's see if I can explain what Anonymous is saying in a way you can understand. "Pagan" films like Coco will always do better at the box office because they have no competition. If Christian movie makers would get their act together and actually make better movies then you might see people going to see them. This is not a matter of the world turning it's back on Christian entertainment in favor of "Pagan" movies, it's a matter of not having any other option because Christian movies are the opposite of entertaining. If you want to see people turn their backs on Coco, make a good Christian film to compete with it.

To be fair, it's also about the majority of the population being the opposite of you: capable of watching fantasy without being uptight legalists.
James Lowery 6 days ago
(This is not the same person who has been responding to you.) I do not think Pixar is necessarily trying to coerce anyone into believing anything. Coco is telling a story about family, and it is using a culture that is based around family to tell its story. Just statistically, I would say that Pixar is made up of workers with several religions and beliefs, including Christians. I doubt they went into the creation of this film with the intention of trying to get children to believe in this version of the afterlife. Now onto the point of quality, I think it plays a huge role here because of the pedigree that Pixar films have. I will go see a movie because I know Pixar makes good movies, so I think that has more to do with it's success than it's choice of setting. As for whether or not people should let their children see it, that is a personal decision. I grew up watching Disney films, and I never once believe that Peter Pan was real, but I learned that growing up doesn't necessarily mean you can't have fun anymore. I watched The Black Cauldron and learned that friendship and self sacrifice are what differentiate "good guys" from "bad guys", but I never thought there was a real skeleton king that could raise an army from the dead. I personally don't think we give children enough credit for being able to discern between reality and fantasy. Now don't get me wrong, I don't mean children should be allowed to watch whatever whenever. I don't think a 6 year old should be watching Batman Begins, even though I think it has an important message about the power of fear. If we are looking at spirituality as the first thing we look at in a film, I think that severely limits what is watched. Sure the Chronicles of Narnia have christian undertones, but I think those movies are atrocious and do more to harm the faith than help it. ( I have a real issue with the allegory in regards to Edmund) I think The Lord of the Rings is a much better option both thematically and quality wise, but I understand content can be an issue for some. Take Silence for instance, amazing film but people where put off just because Scorsese directed it, but it was a very faith-challenging movie, which I think the church needs. Disclaimer I am not a christian, but I frequent these discussions because I am interested in all opinions on these issues.
Inkfeather1 . 6 days ago
I've just realized that the Christian movies versus mainstream movies situation is a lot like the current MCU versus DCEU debate. Most people in this country are Christians, and so they would go to see a well made Christian film. Key words being "well made". Just like most people probably like DC's characters over Marvel's characters, but as long as the DCEU movies continue to be badly made people will go see Marvel movies instead.
bobed 6 days ago
A person's flaws are shown when they reveal their belief in faulty doctrine. You just revealed yours. "MCU vs. DCEU debate?" There is none. There literally is none. More people watched the new Avengers TRAILER then went to see Justice League! The DCEU is a failure. There's no debate anymore.
Inkfeather1 . 6 days ago
You don't get on the internet much do you? There is sadly quite the debate about which is better, with many people claiming that Batman vs Superman is one of the best movies ever made if you are smart enough to understand it. But I'm still mostly puzzling over your first sentence. Since when is MCU vs DCEU a matter of doctrine?? Did I miss the eleventh commandment that said "Thou shalt not watch the DCEU's movies"?
bobed 6 days ago
Unfortunately, Inkfeather, "Coco" is not fantasy. I am perfectly capable of watching harmless little movies like Cinderella or Little Mermaid or what-have-you. No one out there is promoting a religion wherein tentacled sea goddesses take away voices or fairy godmothers bestow dresses. However, there are many millions of people who falsely believe in an untrue version of the afterlife, and this belief - if not remedied before they die - will, according to Christine doctrine, lead them to hell. Full stop. 

For those who already believe in pagan Mexican folklore regarding the afterlife, this movie will only reinforce what they have been taught, not challenge it. For those (especially impressionable young kids) who haven't been introduced to this belief system, Coco not only provides a "how-to" manual for Mexican folklore, it makes said folklore look enticing, fascinating and wonderful. This is a very serious issue. Movies like this, that are this successful, get passed down through the generations. Not only are the kids of today going to be enticed and indoctrinated, their kids and their kids' kids are going to experience the same. 

This is not fantasy. This is a real belief system that millions subscribe to, and it is very dangerous. I believe Mexican folklore and the Day of the Dead are very spiritually dark and foreboding. I won't go so far as to say they are influenced by demons - not on this forum, where no one seems to believe in demons anymore - but I will say that I have my suspicions. At BEST, Pixar has made a very enticing movie about false gods that will no doubt lead millions down the wrong path. It certainly doesn't lead anyone in the direction of Christ. 

If you scoff at my words, fine. I have no doubt you will. However, I urge you, Inkfeather and anyone else who might be reading, to consider the idea that Coco is NOT simply harmless fantasy. 
bobed 6 days ago
Oh, and one more thing. A movie about Christ did come out recently. It was called The Star and it was critically well-received, even if not as much so as Coco. It came out very recently and basically bombed and no one paid any attention to it, despite the fact that by all accounts - including my own - the production values were very good. In fact, I would say The Star even rivaled Pixar in quality. So why the failure? Because people do not want to see movies about Christ. People want to be enticed by pagan nonsense, and they want Pixar's brand name slapped onto said pagan nonsense. That is just where our culture is now. It has nothing to do with "quality." 
Anonymous 6 days ago
A 46% score on Rotten Tomatoes is "critically well-received" now? 
Inkfeather1 . 6 days ago
Coco isn't fantasy? You mean that it's actually right about the afterlife?? Wow, why so upset about it then? Shouldn't we be more interested in this fascinating documentary on what the afterlife is truly like? Seriously, learn the difference between fantasy and reality. Coco IS fantasy and no one is going to believe that what is shown in a Pixar movie is actually how real life works. I don't know millions of people who think fish talk and monsters live in another world accessed via our closets, so you are completely overreacting to think that people are suddenly going to convert to ancient Central American beliefs in mass just because of an animated kids film.

As for your post under this one, I watched the trailers for both Coco and The Star on YouTube. Either you don't watch much quality animation or you are flat out lying. The animation for The Star isn't even CLOSE to how good the animation for Coco is. The Star's trailer was also nothing but jokes, none of which I found funny because I'd seen them all done before.  It's also not a movie about Christ, it's a movie about a donkey. Big difference there. I'm definitely not surprised Coco is doing better than it.
charitysplace 6 days ago
Coco is about a belief system very few people outside of Mexico understand or know about; it's a brand new story to most audiences... whereas they have been over-saturated with Baby Jesus stories from childhood.

In other words, people are looking for NEW (for them) stories rather than remakes.
bobed 6 days ago
Let me reply to all of you at once.

"Coco is about a belief system very few people outside of Mexico understand or know about." Oh, so only a hundred million people then, plus the enormous Mexican diaspora? A pittance! 

"Coco isn't fantasy? You mean that it's actually right about the afterlife??" Don't be intellectually dishonest. I think you know that is not what I was saying. This is a belief system that exists in the real world, not a fantastical story about fairy godmothers. I even explained it in my post. You are so dishonest and word-twisting that it is impossible to have a real discussion with you. 

By the way, I thought The Star was great. Last time I checked on Rotten Tomatoes it had a score in the 70s, so my mistake. And we must have a difference in eyesight, because I see little difference between the animation quality of The Star and Coco. 

Does anyone disagree with me on the concept that Coco is peddling false religion to children? That is my point here.
bobed 5 days ago
Hilariously but not surprisingly, I am still waiting. Anyone got a response? Anyone at all? (Crickets chirping)

People love to attack me personally and attack my message, but they don't love to actually give arguments against my real point that make any darn sense.
charitysplace 5 days ago
My comment stands.

Many audiences aren't familiar with this sort of story, so they're flocking to something 'new' to them. That and Pixar's reputation is selling the film.

I cannot comment on whether it's inappropriate to 'peddle this to children' until I've seen it.
bobed 5 days ago
I haven't seen it. I likely never will see it. Coco looks like a gorgeous and lushly animated film full of rich storytelling, a diverse cast, and all of Pixar's best goodies stuffed in. And it's also got a message and a plot that I don't need to see to understand. This movie is bad news for Christians and for anyone who values the teachings of the apostles and Christ. You don't need to see it to figure that one out.
Julienne Dy 6 days ago
1.  I personally have VERY fond memories of Sunday school lessons and Wednesday chapels.  Were they always entertaining?  No,  but they were uplifting,  edifying, and, dare I say it,  fun.  I personally wouldn't mind watching a movie with all those same qualities. 
2.  I thought the Kendrick brothers movies were good.   I mean,  Courageous and War Room moved me.  Ms. Clara is hands down my favorite character out of everyone in all the movies.   Fireproof made me cry.
3.  I think PART of the problem with Christian movies is that secular audiences don't know what about them is supposed to be enjoyable.  I mean,  Christian movies,  especially the Kendrick brothers movies, are very good at driving home the point that our lives are meaningless and empty without God at the front and center.  Other than Christians, who in the world WANTS to hear that from a movie?
Julienne Dy 6 days ago
Also, in response to you're comments about Nativity movies, I thought The Nativity was good and that Mary, Joseph, and the Magi were well-humanized.  I'm not sure that's an actual term.
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bobed 6 days ago
Not all Christian movies are like that. Fireproof in particular - not a movie I really liked, but a good example. In the movie, Kirk Cameron's character follows Biblical teachings and seeks God's help to save his marriage...but ultimately, no miracle beings his wife back to him. His own hard work and commitment to God's word brings his wife back to him. His struggle is shown in great detail. The movie's ultimate message is that, if you're willing to work hard enough, Christ is worth it. This is one of the most famous and popular Christian movies, too. 

Anonymous 5 days ago
And it's still pretty bad. Sure, it's a bit better than other Christian movies, but it's still trite and vaguely sexist. 

Also, although you keep saying that quality doesn't matter, it does. Even with medicine. Would you rather go for the medicine that has limited effectiveness and is quick to make, or the one that is highly effective and takes a bit longer? 
bobed 5 days ago
I keep saying that quality doesn't matter? Where have I said that? 

Quality matters. However, the issue here isn't quality. Honestly, yes, I would rather have a thousand "bad" Christian movies (by secular and biased critics' standards) than one "good" one. Give me a thousand doctrinally-sound Christian movies that the critics hate, over one The Da Vinci Code that has religious themes and is loved by secular critics, but distorts the truth. 

Note, however, that this does not include movies like Noah and Exodus Gods and Kings. These are movies that both the secular critics AND me can agree are awful, if only because of how they blasphemously distorted the word. 
Anonymous 5 days ago
Uh, bobed? Hate to break it to you, but The Da Vinci Code pulled a 25% score on Rotten Tomatoes. "Loved by secular critics" it was not. 
bobed 5 days ago
Noah, then. 76% approval rating by secular critics. Includes crazy, unBiblical storylines like fallen angels being trapped in stone and assisting Noah, Noah wanting to kill his grandchildren, and so forth. Critics eat up any nonsense with "religious themes," but secular society isn't at all concerned with getting things right. Noah was blasphemous. 76% of critics liked it.
Anonymous 4 days ago
And Prince of Egypt--which aside from a few small storytelling details, remains true to the Biblical account and original intent--has a 79% on that same site. Why would they do this? Because Prince of Egypt brought the drama and tragedy of the Exodus story to life in an engaging, well-crafted way. 

So far as Noah goes, remember that to non-Christian critics, the stories in the Bible are just stories. Those stories command no more reverence for a non-Christian than Greek mythology or Welsh folklore. So a well-made movie that veers off the Biblical account will not be blasphemous to them; they'll instead see it as a creative and perhaps refreshing retelling. 

It's up to Christians to prove that the stories are fine as-is, that good movies can be made without adding in rock monsters and attempted filicide. The key word here is GOOD. Prince of Egypt proves that Biblical content doesn't deter critical praise, so long as that content is made into a good movie. 
bobed 4 days ago
All due respect to you, Prince of Egypt came out 18 years ago. Could you possibly name a more recent example?
Evan Weisensel 4 days ago
Woodlawn and a Case For Christ. Both very Christian movies made by the guys who made God's not dead and God's not Dead 2: the Atheistic Boogaloo, both have higher than average scores on Rotten Tomatoes by "secular" movie critics. A 77% and a 55% respectively. (Not amazing, but better than most) 
Evan Weisensel 7 days ago
The fact that Justice League is doing decently and still bombed spectacularly is a sign that Hollywood itself needs a reboot. That, or DC needs to find out what makes a good cinematic universe.... :P
bobed 5 days ago
Cohesion between films. A consistent tone. Films that actually connect with each other and make sense as a whole. None of which the DCEU has.
Evan Weisensel 5 days ago
I take it you weren't as much of a fan of Wonder Woman as the rest of the movie going populace if you say that all of the DCEU films were bad?
bobed 5 days ago
Wonder Woman is the same boring superhero that we have seen a hundred thousand times, only now she happens to be female, and so every woman in the world salivates over her. When you're starving, a Big Mac and some fries look like a gourmet feast, I suppose.

Take note that when I say "Marvel is way better than the DCEU,' all I mean is that "Marvel stinks slightly less." I don't really like Marvel - I think all their movies are corporate and samey-samey. I gave up following them years ago, probably when the first Avengers came out. That being said, they are leaps and bounds ahead of the DC movies. 

I made the mistake of trying Suicide Squad, only heaven knows why - just like I made the mistake of trying Man of Steel years before, and Batman v. Superman after that. Yes, for all my preening and hemming and hawing, I still like to indulge my entertainment sensibilities now and then. At my heart, I'm sort of a superhero movie fan (more so in my younger days). But every time I finish a DC movie, I wonder why the heck I bothered. For Marvel's faults, at least they are consistent. Once they get one thing right, they stick with it. DCEU has not yet gotten a single thing right except for appealing to the female half of the population with Wonder Woman earlier this year. Not a single darn thing. 
Anonymous 5 days ago
"Wonder Woman is the same boring superhero that we have seen a hundred thousand times, only now she happens to be female, and so every woman in the world salivates over her."

And this right here is why you need to see movies before ranting about them. Had you actually watched Wonder Woman, you would know that it's a thoughtful meditation on how everyone has good and evil in them, and how one person can't solve all of society's problems, but they CAN do SOMETHING, and that something is everything. It's powerful and genuinely moving, not "the same boring superhero that we have seen a hundred thousand times." 
bobed 5 days ago
No, sorry. I HAVE seen Wonder Woman. My family rented the movie not long ago. I watched the whole silly thing, including the ridiculous twist at the end, its flagrant aping of Captain America: The First Avenger, and so on and so forth. None of us was particularly impressed. Sorry to break your silly assumptions. 
Anonymous 4 days ago
Do you sit there wondering how rude you can be to people before they stop talking to you? I mean, you really seem to be trying to break some sort of record here. 
Anonymous 4 days ago
I've asked you before and I'll ask you again: Is this how Jesus treated sinners? Can you call yourself a Christian, knowing that you treat people the way Pharisees treated those they considered beneath them? 
bobed 4 days ago
I'm just about done being Christ-like here. I openly admit I'm not a model of Jesus, but the ignorance and rudeness and complete disregard for Biblical truth of the other commenters here has become too much. I'm done walking on eggshells. Sorry.