Coco Tops the Box Office Again

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Coco movie monday

Thanksgiving is long gone. But at the movies, we’re still dealing with leftovers.

With Hollywood pivoting toward awards season, no major movies were released wide this week, leaving the box-office field in the domain of long-in-the-tooth holdovers. Indeed, the top five was a complete clone of last week’s.

Coco topped the weekend’s box-office tourney, collecting $26.1 million and bringing its total North American tally to $108.7 million. Add another $171 million from overseas, and Coco is giving Disney and Pixar something to sing about.

In second, Justice League gathered another $16.6 million to its marbled halls—perhaps not quite enough to buy Wonder Woman an invisible jet, but certainly enough to keep the Batmobile in unleaded for a while. Justice League’s total domestic tally now stands at a batarang under $200 million—$197.3 million, to be precise—and it’s now 10th among the year’s highest-grossing movies.

Wonder spent a second straight week at No. 3, banking a reasonably wonder-ful $12.5 million. It beat out Thor: Ragnarok ($9.7 million), which naturally settled for Thorth—er, fourth. Daddy’s Home 2 closed out the top five with $7.5 million.

The entertainment industry is always interested in how much money a movie makes at the box office, of course. But we’re also starting to see some awards hopefuls land in a few theaters here and there, prepping for their Oscar runs. Two Oscarbait flicks, Lady Bird and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, finished in a dead head for seventh place, both earning about $4.5 million. (Early estimates have Lady Bird with an ever-so-slight lead.)

The Disaster Artist opened in just 19 theaters, but still finished in the top 12 with $1.2 million. That’s a sky-high $64,254-per-theater average, in case you’re curious. (For the sake of comparison, Coco’s per-theater average was $6,550, about a tenth of The Disaster Artist.) But even that per-theater average looked pretty soggy compared to that of The Shape of Water. Sure, this merman-woman love story finished 19th with a mere $166,800—but it opened in just two theaters. Two! Do the math, and each one of those theaters banked $83,400.

Wonder Wheel, Woody Allen’s newest flick, finished 20th,  just behind The Shape of Water, with $140,555 in five theaters.

Who wrote this?

Paul Asay has been writing for Plugged In since 2007 and loves superheroes and finding God in unexpected places. In addition, Paul has also written several books, with his newest—Burning Bush 2.0—recently published by Abingdon Press. When Paul’s not reviewing movies, he hikes with his wife, Wendy, runs marathons with his grown kids, Colin and Emily, and beats back unruly houseplants. Follow him on Twitter @AsayPaul.

Have something to say? Leave a comment.

charitysplace More than 1 year ago
"This movie is bad news for Christians and for anyone who values the teachings of the apostles and Christ. You don't need to see it to figure that one out."

Why?

Why would a little pagan movie threaten my relationship with Jesus?

I saw Pocahontas a hundred times as a child. It has pagan themes galore, and failed to make a nit's bit of difference in my belief system. I doubt "Coco" will change my mind as an adult. If anything, it may enlighten me on how people of that belief system think and some of their core beliefs, which is valuable knowledge. 

It seems like this film is an excellent opportunity to talk to older kids about diverse belief systems and how each culture has their own mythology about life after death; how every civilization has believed in an afterlife, and that points toward the TRUE life after death, which is found in Christ.

Most things are opportunities to speak the truth, which you cannot do if you avoid them. ;)
Julienne Dy More than 1 year ago
I don't quite agree with everything that you've said, but you provide some good insight.
1. Every kid is different, and unfortunately, not every kid is going to process through this movie the same way, so I feel that it's important for parents to know and understand their kids before they take them to see this movie.
Take me and Disney princesses for example.  I look at a Disney princess, and I'm drawn by their kindness, courage, optimism, and selflessness (except for Ariel, honestly, her only redeeming quality is her curiosity, which isn't really all that redeeming).  Other girls may look at a Disney princess and get body issues.
2.  I think you have the right idea about teaching older children how to process through the media that they consume.  It will help them better understand why people believe what they do and maybe that understanding will help them to better own their faith.
3.  I'm not sure I want to see Coco.  On one hand, it's a movie centered around a pagan belief system.  On the other hand, I've also seen The Book of Life which had a similar premise, and pagan belief system aside, it did tell a very nice story, and based on what my sister had told me, Coco may be the same way.  On the other other hand, it's about Dia de los Muertos.  I know Mexicans love the holiday, but the idea of interacting with the ghosts of your dead ancestors creeps me out a bit, so I'm personally not a fan.  On the other other other hand, I'm a huge mythology buff.  I used to read a lot of books on mythology back when I was in high school.  On the other times four hand, I really, REALLY want to see that Frozen Christmas special that comes before the movie.  On the other times five hand, by the time I'll have time to see it, theaters won't be playing that special with the movie anymore!  >:-(  That gives us six hands for people keeping score.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Posted by First Comment Guy

I saw Justice League again this past weekend; I still feel like it's a good movie. It's Rotten Tomato score should be somewhere between 65-75% instead of 41%, imo.

A lot of people have a lot to complain about the movie, and while I think their complaints are valid, I'm surprised that no one else is having my biggest complaint.

Here it is:
"Why didn't Danny Elfman use the theme song from Justice League: The Animated Series?! That would've been GOLD! He brought back the theme songs from Tim Burton's Batman and Richard Donner's Superman, so how come he didn't do the same with JL:TAS? Come on..."

Okay, there it is.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Posted by First Comment Guy

Thanks! I had been looking for that song!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Part of the problem is that many Christian movies don't hold a candle to movies like Coco in terms of quality. It would be possible to do a great, tearjerking, high-quality movie about the Nativity—focus on Mary and Joseph as young parents in over their heads but willing to let God use them, which would humanize the entire story—but every Nativity movie I've seen is less about telling a good story and more about presenting a Sunday school lesson. 

Contrast that with The Prince of Egypt, which is unequivocally about Moses and makes it clear that God is behind the burning bush and the plagues, and is regarded as an animated classic. It's a good story well-told, and it trusts its characters to deliver its messages. It was the first movie that really brought the Exodus story to life for me, and I know I'm not the only one. It's possible to tell a Bible story in a way that non-Christians will watch, but to do that, filmmakers need to tell a story instead of preaching a sermon. 
Julienne Dy More than 1 year ago
1.  I personally have VERY fond memories of Sunday school lessons and Wednesday chapels.  Were they always entertaining?  No,  but they were uplifting,  edifying, and, dare I say it,  fun.  I personally wouldn't mind watching a movie with all those same qualities. 
2.  I thought the Kendrick brothers movies were good.   I mean,  Courageous and War Room moved me.  Ms. Clara is hands down my favorite character out of everyone in all the movies.   Fireproof made me cry.
3.  I think PART of the problem with Christian movies is that secular audiences don't know what about them is supposed to be enjoyable.  I mean,  Christian movies,  especially the Kendrick brothers movies, are very good at driving home the point that our lives are meaningless and empty without God at the front and center.  Other than Christians, who in the world WANTS to hear that from a movie?
Evan Weisensel More than 1 year ago
The fact that Justice League is doing decently and still bombed spectacularly is a sign that Hollywood itself needs a reboot. That, or DC needs to find out what makes a good cinematic universe.... :P
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Evan Weisensel More than 1 year ago
I take it you weren't as much of a fan of Wonder Woman as the rest of the movie going populace if you say that all of the DCEU films were bad?